affiliated faculty

Please note that this list is updated as new faculty are affiliated and is more current than the General Catalog listing.

English

Swati Rana specializes in twentieth-century American literature, comparative ethnic literature, and transnational American studies. Her research focuses on the relationship between literary and social forms, exploring how ethnic literature represents the complexities of minority identity and how ethnic writers creatively negotiate and refigure pressing social questions. She teaches undergraduate courses on diasporic literature, the idea of America, immigrant autobiography, model minority myths, and postracial discourse. Her graduate courses examine new paradigms in comparative ethnic literary studies as well as articulations of race and form within postcolonial and transnational frameworks. Her research has appeared in American Literary History and American Literature. She is currently working on a book project that presents a comparative study of problem characters in early twentieth-century U.S. ethnic literature.

Religious Studies

Professor Reynolds' teaching and research interests include Arabic languages and literatures, folklore and folklife. He is the author of Arab Folklore: A Handbook (2007) and Heroic Poets, Poetic Heroes: The Ethnography of Performance in an Arabic Oral Epic Tradition (1995), and section editor for and contributing author  to The Cambridge History of Arabic Literature: the Post-Classical Period  (Part IV: Popular Prose; 2006).

East Asian Studies

Prof. Saltzman-Li's research is primarily on pre-modern Japanese literature and drama, especially kabuki. Her book, Creating Kabuki Plays: Context for Kezairoku, "Valuable Notes on Playwriting" (2010) is organized around a study of the only extant Edo-period treatise fully devoted to the work of the playwright. It examines kabuki play creation and playwrights, as well as interactions among various artistic groups of the latter half of the Edo Period.

English

Russell Samolsky's research interests include South African literature, Jewish studies, animal studies, and the global humanities. His book, Apocalyptic Futures: Marked Bodies and the Violence of the Text in Kafka, Conrad, and Coetzee, which takes account of the complex relationship between past apocalyptic texts and future catastrophic events, was published by Fordham University Press in 2011. His current book project, “Killing Dogs,” examines the place of the dog in the contemporary literary and theoretical discourse on the question of the animal.

Chicana and Chicano Studies

Prof. Sandoval's research areas include: Cyber and millennial studies, third space feminism, critical media theory and production, oppositional consciousness, social movement. Main publications: Methodology of the Oppressed (2000);  “New Sciences: Cyborg Feminism,” CyberSexualities: A Reader on Feminist Theory, Cyborgs and Cyberspace (2000); The Chicano Studies Reader: An Anthology of Aztlán, 1970-2000 (2001), co-edited with Chon Noriega, KarenMary Davelos, and Rafael Perez-Torres.

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